Plastics Industry Uses the Pandemic to Boost Production

This article by bporter from Green America on July 13, 2020, shows how industry uses any excuse not to respect the environment and the public interest.

Locally, we see that if you order groceries delivered or for pickup, you are also consuming a huge number, over double thickness, of single-use plastic bags; and even if you shop in person, many stores will not let you bring in your own bags (your own clothes and shoes, fine, it seems).

And In West Chester we’ve seen that the state legislature has taken the opportunity to extend its “ban on the ban” of single-use plastic bags and straws.

“…there is a lack of substantive evidence to back up claims that daily items such as single-use plastic bags and food service ware are less likely to transmit the coronavirus. The industry has commonly cited older studies that only confirm bacteria can accumulate on unwashed bags (and that washing reusable bags destroys the bacteria).

“Recently, over 100 scientists from 18 countries affirmed that reusables are safe and don’t increase the chance of virus transmission. They state that single-use plastics are not inherently safer and cause additional public health concerns….”

Read the article at Green America

Purslane

by Nathaniel Smith

As mentioned in “Summer Solstice Report“:

This is the season for my summer favorite forage food, purslane. To the left is a small patch that I was happy to find on June 27.

Purslane is a succulent related to the garden plant portulaca. It’s an annual that seeds itself very efficiently whether you like it or not. So you might as well like it and consume it! It adds a nice taste and crunchiness to salads and sandwiches, and has exceptional food and health value.

Now with 3 weeks of hot weather, more purslane plants have grown up and flourished. I find that if you keep picking off and consuming the ends of the shoots and the more developed leaves, the root keeps putting out new tender leaves. Then it forms a succulent mat (this one is over a foot across) of salad materials that you didn’t even need to plant.

Theoretically purslane can be cooked, but I prefer to do that at most for a few seconds and only to add as a sort of herb to a plate you are warming up in the microwave. Purslane, like some other fairly sturdy edibles such as bloody sorrel, does contain oxalic acid, of which you don’t want to eat a lot if you have kidney issues; so if that worries you, you can boil purslane as a vegetable or soup ingredient to remove most of the oxalic acid.

Friends of Sustainable West Chester

Here’s a great new initiative from West Chester Borough’s Sustainability Advisory Committee: to put together a network of volunteers who can help SAC research different topics and inform the public. This aligns closely with the West Chester Green Team’s aspirations!

Here is the official description:

The Sustainability Advisory Committee established Friends of Sustainable West Chester consisting of volunteers working to further sustainability initiatives in the Borough. The group serves three primary purposes:

• Create issue-focused teams to supplement the SAC’s work on key areas (e.g. energy, stormwater, recycling)
• Broaden citizen awareness and involvement in Borough sustainability initiatives
• Recruit future SAC leadership

Efforts of each team are coordinated by a 2nd year SAC member. Activities will be limited to research, organization of events or initiatives, and volunteering time and resources. There are no standing meetings.

Click here to join Friends of Sustainable West Chester.

Membership is subject to SAC approval.

They’re Back! The Spotted Lanternfly Returns

Advice from WCU Office of sustainability Summer Bulletin No. 4: June 22, 2020

If you’ve spent any time outside in the past few weeks, you’ve likely spotted the above pictured Spotted Lanternfly Instar, or early stage nymph. The Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive species spreading throughout the state of Pennsylvania, negatively affecting agricultural crops and hardwood trees. In an effort to decrease their numbers, the following steps are recommended:

• Remove host vegetation (tree of heaven, oriental bittersweet, grape, etc.) but realize that when they are in their early instar stages, they are more generalist, and can be found feeding on a variety of plants, including ornamentals.

• Smash them if you can catch them – they’re very quick and jumpy at this early instar stage, so this is difficult. For these early instars, pillow cases can be placed around full branches and vines, closed around the limb, then after shaking to release the bugs from the limbs, smash in the pillowcase.

• Put up Web-Cote brand sticky bands with wire mesh to avoid birds and small mammals being caught (pictured here), or

BugBarrier bands , or

• Circle trunk traps (make your own)

 

A more rustic trellis

Here’s a more rustic trellis than the one pictured earlier and made with metal supports and nylon mesh.

This one is made out of fallen branches tied together at the joints with pieces of wire or string. Pieces that fall apart are easily replaced. Very good for peas, but not recommended for heavier veggies like squash and cucumbers!

My view of composting

by Nathaniel Smith, June 8, 2020

I have never figured out how to build a compost heap that would heat up enough to kill weed seeds. The compost manuals make it sound simple, but it isn’t! (See lots of really good composting advice from the Chester County Solid Waste Authority, though.)

For me, patience is the key. I just make a big pile and turn it over every couple of months (more often is better, of course!). If it’s not turned over, pockets of wet leaves or dry branch parts can form and sit for years.

My heap is long, narrow, and tall. I leave a blank spot from which I remove usable compost, and then I move the next 4-foot segment into the gap….

Read more here.

Compostable packing on compostOf several photos in the original linked  post, here is one showing compostable packaging materials, used by Bob’s Red Mill, well on its way to returning to nature on a bed of fresh cuttings in my compost heap.

Here’s an add-on as of July 17: one of the pleasures of gardening and composting, for me, is the surprise factor, the unpredictability, as when sparse echinacea suddenly fills in an entire bed, or a persimmon tree that has produced 3 fruits in 3 years seems on its way to dozens. My experience with the patient compost method was that the pile only really decomposed into usable product in the lowest 6 to 12 inches. Today, while moving one section onto Dirt layer in compost copyanother to get to the bottom of it, I came across a good layer of compost perfect for loosening up the soil where I was about to plant potatoes. It was like doing archeology, finding a productive layer in the middle of the accumulation. It even had earthworms (look closely) in it! It was above a matted layer of leaves, which may have stopped moisture from permeating and made a wet area that decomposed faster than the rest.

Read more of the original post here.

“Nature abhors a vacuum”

Life tends to fill all possible niches, from the extreme depths of the sea to roofs of our homes to even our own digestive system. Gardeners know this all to well, because it’s not as if we weed once and relax. There are millions of weed seeds just waiting to be dampened, or warmed by the sun, or turned over in the soil, and then they will be hard at work to fill the void, that is, the open space between our vegetable plants!

Here is a hosta that has fond a presumably hospitable spot (we’ll see if it gets enough nutrition to flower) in a crevice in bark on Sharpless St., West Chester: